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On 10/19/2010 3:18 PM, Tim wrote:
> This interests me, as a video production person who's still in the
> analogue world, because the Windows/Mac worlds of digital video just
> plain suck, unless you can throw broadcasting amounts of dollars at
> software and hardware.  (Those who've used real editing hardware know
> just how annoying computer editors are with their interfaces, and lack
> of knobs to just reach out and tweak, with menus to wade through.)
> We're still using a $20,000 edit suite, because we're not going to throw
> that away to be replaced with horrible $2,000 computer editing.
>
> Have you compared using this with the usual opposition (Adobe Premiere,
> Pinnacle, FinalCut, etc.)?  Operation-wise, and rendering time-wise?
>
> One thing we've noticed with some of the free editing software is that
> you're going to spend so much time trying to render the final product
> that you can't use it professionally.  And that things fall over and die
> a few seconds into trying to acquire your vision, in the first place.

I've got a linear editing suite with tape decks and a Pinnacle Aladdin 
for DVE (once in a blue moon, we still fire it up); in 1999, we acquired 
a DPS Velocity NLE - it was ~$20 with the computer, the boardset, the 
dual CRT's and the big Sony NTSC reference monitor; I never looked back. 
I now also have Sony Vegas and Adobe Premiere workstations - the latter 
don't compare to the SD Velocity, but they can handle all the new 
formats including HD, which our aging Velocity can't. The Velocity could 
mix two tracks of video with DVE transitions, plus two tracks of 
graphics, be they pics or titles or whatever, including moving video, 
all in real, real time, with full raster display on a big NTSC monitor. 
The HD workstations didn't come close to this performance till just 
recently. Now, they are getting very close...

I've worked with Cinelerra for years - it's a great piece of open-source 
software, but, it's not in the same league as the products I listed 
above - it just has too many bugs, and a number of limitations that keep 
it from being viable in a weekly/daily production environment.

KDEnlive and OpenShot are nice little programs that are more oriented to 
hobby-use and very limited lower-end production environments.

I keep up with this stuff very closely. I haven't yet tried to install 
OpenShot on my new F14 boxes, so I can't speak to Robert's, the OP's 
original question, unfortunately

-- 
Claude Jones
Brunswick, MD, USA
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