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McGuffey, David C. wrote:
> 
> In the mean time, I spent a bit of time last night playing with the
> mount options in fstab.  I added the
> context=system_u:object_r:samba_share_t option but ended up with some
> strange behavior.
> 
> Per the guidance from the selinux error message, I unmounted the ntfs
> partion, issued the chcon command and the selinux type of
> /mnt/winxp_data was changed to samba_share_t. When the ntfs partion is
> mounted, the type changes to fusefs_t, which then causes selinux to
> complain.  I unmount the partition, and the mount point returns to
> samba_share_t. I issued the chcon command with the ntfs partition
> mounted, but because the files on ntfs don't have extended attributes,
> chon pukes.
> 
This is the expected behavior. When you use a directory as a mount
point, the permissions of the directory are overridden by the mount
command as long as the file system is mounted there. When you
unmount the file system, the original permissions are again in
force. When you do not specify permissions, the defaults for the
file system type are used. The exact values depend on the file
system type. For example, the default user and group for a FAT file
system is the user/group mounting it, but not for an ext3 file
system, the owner/group of the file system is used.

On an added note, the directory used as a mount point does not need
to be empty, but you will lose access to the contents while it is
used as a mount point. The exception to this is that open files are
still accessible to the programs that have them open, but only until
they close them.

Mikkel
-- 

  Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons,
for thou art crunchy and taste good with Ketchup!

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